Cheesy / New Scientist

Cheesy / New Scientist

“I’m happy to live without meat.

But lately I have been wrangling with my conscience again.”

[The truth about cheese: The terrible costs of our favourite food | New Scientist]

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[ Reviewed Unto Righteousness Below ]

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In my college days, I had to write a final exam paper entitled, What Is An Adequate Scientific Explanation?

The course only had one exam with one question, and an individual passed or failed the whole course based solely on that test question.

The exam question was given the final week of school, and there were no coloring sheets to relieve stress provided at that time in college.

Guess what kind of class it was? It was a philosophy class, not a science class.

Always keep in mind that science is more philosophy than it is factual science. As you can see one sub-topic of New Scientist is Angles and Demons – kinda a science fact, philosophical vodoo of words. This is why God, who gives Truth that sets men free, warns: See to it that no one takes you captive through hollow and deceptive philosophy, which depends on human tradition and the basic principles of this world rather than on Christ. (Colossians 2:8)



Oh, my grade?

I was one of the few that passed the exam being given a B+ with the comment “great promise.”

However, shortly God would have me drop out of college without graduating and begin preaching the Truth. By the standards of the world, and to the consternation of those around me, I became a fool. [Do not deceive yourselves. If any one of you thinks he is wise by the standards of this age, he should become a “fool” so that he may become wise. (1 Corinthians 3:18)]



Now on to New Scientist,  issue 3217, 16 February 2019 and the monumental alarm over cheese.

And God said, “Who told you that you were naked?”

(Genesis 3:11)

Because of sin, a false sense of guilt is a direct result of separation from God. Thus, the cheese guilt.

Here these egg-heads go again preaching their self-righteous-give-it-all-up-cause-were-gonna-die-don’t-you-fill-guilty-for-doing-that science-sermon.

This time the egg-heads after having gone for the meat we eat are after our cheese.

Naturally, the egg-head, guru, pretentious scientist heralded as mini-gods these days can talk of “guilt” and “sin” just don’t you, you un-enlightened mortal, bring up God and Jesus.

To have some fun just go onto a “scientific” message thread and make one little-itty-bitty mention of God. You can count the atomic micro-seconds to the time it takes them to kick you out. This I know for a scientific fact.

[The truth about cheese: The terrible costs of our favourite food | New Scientist]

“I’m happy to live without meat. But lately I have been wrangling with my conscience again.

Cheese is made from milk, and milk comes from cows. Cattle farming is appalling for the climate. Cows belch out vast amounts of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that no known technology can stop from being vented into the atmosphere.

Most dairy farming is a form of factory farming, with all the attendant animal rights issues. I haven’t kept a record, but I am sure my cheese consumption has gone up since I swore off meat.

So have I just swapped one environmental and animal welfare sin for another – one that is possibly even worse?”

If these egg-heads would only repent, God could tell them what to really feel guilty about. Then He would provide God-given wisdom on how to manage the production of cheese.  But then for an egg-head to become wise he, or she, would have to surrender their pride and become a fool by the standards of this age. 1

Do not let New Scientist tell you what to feel guilty about. Instead, hunger and thirst for righteousness and you will be filled not with some cheesy scientific thesis but with holy bread from above.2

Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled. (Matthew 5:6)

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Reviewed Unto Righteousness
www.enumclaw.com | Proverbs 18:2 | Timothy Williams
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“But lately I have been wrangling with my conscience again.

…So have I just swapped one environmental and animal welfare sin for another – one that is possibly even worse?”

– Graham Lawton,  The truth about cheese: The terrible costs of our favourite food | New Scientist

“By Graham Lawton

MY NAME is Graham, and I’m a cheesoholic.

I’m generally quite restrained at the table, but I can’t resist cheese. Hard, soft, runny, smoked, blue, British, continental, pasteurised, unpasteurised. If there is cheese on offer, I will keep on eating it until one of us is defeated. I eat it for breakfast and snack on it at night.

Recently, my cheese habit has become even more central to my diet. Last year I quit meat, finally fed up by its environmental and animal welfare record. It wasn’t easy, but what was there to fill the void? Why, my old friend cheese! Halloumi, paneer and parmesan are now my beef, chicken and pork.

I’m happy to live without meat. But lately I have been wrangling with my conscience again. Cheese is made from milk, and milk comes from cows. Cattle farming is appalling for the climate. Cows belch out vast amounts of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that no known technology can stop from being vented into the atmosphere. Most dairy farming is a form of factory farming, with all the attendant animal rights issues. I haven’t kept a record, but I am sure my cheese consumption has gone up since I swore off meat. So have I just swapped one environmental and animal welfare sin for another – one that is possibly even worse?

This is an uncomfortable question for many people. A number of my colleagues said, half-jokingly, “please don’t do that story”. They were saying they would rather not know. They were right.” [The truth about cheese: The terrible costs of our favourite food | New Scientist]