1,000 Years : Data : Doomsday Vault

1,000 Years : Data : Doomsday Vault

 

But instead of storing seeds, this vast library has been built to ensure the survival of the world’s most important books, documents, and data.

“We believe that we can save the data using our technology for a whole 1,000 years,” Katrine Loen Thomsen from Norwegian technology company Piql told local broadcaster NRK. [reference article below] Doomsday Vault


From Hitler’s 1,000 reign to storage of data for a 1,000 years something spiritual is alive.

Just a quick peek at the spiritual-psychological fixation with the construct of a 1,000 years.

Behind the curtian of spirituality within us all is the idea, we somehow know that a 1,000 years carries great weight.

Blessed and holy are those who have part in the first resurrection. The second death has no power over them, but they will be priests of God and of Christ and will reign with him for a thousand years. When the thousand years are over, Satan will be released from his prison  (Revelation 20:6-7)

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enumclaw.com ~ opinion unto righteousness ~ timothy williams

Article Reference

(sciencealert.com)—In the side of a mountain atop the frigid wastelands of the Norway’s Svalbard archipelago sits the Arctic ‘doomsday vault’ – an ominous facility that’s locked away close to a million seed samples from almost every country on Earth.

Designed to keep the seeds safe from nuclear war or some other global catastrophe, the Svalbard Global Seed Bank just got a new neighbour, with a second doomsday vault opening up nearby. But instead of storing seeds, this vast library has been built to ensure the survival of the world’s most important books, documents, and data.

“We believe that we can save the data using our technology for a whole 1,000 years,” Katrine Loen Thomsen from Norwegian technology company Piql told local broadcaster NRK.

Known as the Arctic World Archive, this new facility has been built into the same frozen mountain as the original seed vault, and is open to governments and research facilities from around the world as a place for storing their records.

Companies and private individuals can also pay for the privilege of having their information locked underground for at least the next millennium, deep inside an abandoned mine that’s been frozen in Arctic permafrost.